Cultural Activities in Beijing this February

We are facing difficult times at the moment in China. People are worried about getting sick, and transportation and daily life is being disrupted. Despite this, life does still have to go on. If you have decided to stick it out, and are looking for things to do in Beijing in the coming few weeks, there are still several options for cultural activities from Cultural Keys, Culture Yard, Black Sesame Kitchen and B-Electric Beijing . Read on to find out what’s happening!

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What to expect in the Year of the Rat!

In many Western countries rats and mice are simultaneously considered to carry disease and also to be cute. Similarly, in China, whilst the animal itself is still unwelcome, as the first of the twelve zodiac signs rats are actually very auspicious. So what lies ahead this new year? Read on to find out what kind of energy the Rat will be bringing you!

In China, the new year is calculated according to the lunar calendar (农历; Nónglì). Although the Gregorian calendar is standard, the lunar calendar dictates the dates of traditional Chinese holidays and helps people choose auspicious days for important life changes such as weddings, funerals, moving house or starting a business.

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福 – China’s luckiest character? 2020 Edition

At Spring Festival there are many ways to decorate, but one of the most common is to paste the character ‘fu’, 福, on doors and windows. There is evidence that this custom dates back to the Song dynasty (AD 960 – 1279).

福 is pronounced fú and means ‘blessings’. It is traditionally handwritten in black or gold ink by itself on square red paper, with the corners pointing in the directions of the compass, and it is hung up facing outwards to keep bad luck away and bring good luck to the home. It is often hung with other decorations, such as couplets and red lanterns.

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Chinese Spring Festival 2020 – A day by day guide!

Spring Festival is much more than New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day! Starting from New Year’s Day, the entire festival actually lasts 15 days – although some people measure it from the Laba Festival (January 2nd) or Xiao Nian (January 17th)!

Read on to find out more information about some of the most important days of the festival and the history and traditions to be aware of, as well as exactly which date they fall on in 2020! 

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