Cultural Activities in Beijing this February

We are facing difficult times at the moment in China. People are worried about getting sick, and transportation and daily life is being disrupted. Despite this, life does still have to go on. If you have decided to stick it out, and are looking for things to do in Beijing in the coming few weeks, there are still several options for cultural activities from Cultural Keys, Culture Yard, Black Sesame Kitchen and B-Electric Beijing . Read on to find out what’s happening!

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福 – China’s luckiest character? 2020 Edition

At Spring Festival there are many ways to decorate, but one of the most common is to paste the character ‘fu’, 福, on doors and windows. There is evidence that this custom dates back to the Song dynasty (AD 960 – 1279).

福 is pronounced fú and means ‘blessings’. It is traditionally handwritten in black or gold ink by itself on square red paper, with the corners pointing in the directions of the compass, and it is hung up facing outwards to keep bad luck away and bring good luck to the home. It is often hung with other decorations, such as couplets and red lanterns.

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Access, experience, understand and enjoy authentic Chinese culture with Cultural Keys!

 
Want to get the most out of your time in China? Interested in learning more about the traditional culture and perhaps even experiencing it for yourself?
 
Cultural Keys Chinese Culture Centre helps expat residents and visitors experience, understand and enjoy traditional Chinese culture by providing a variety of authentic content, classes, presentations and services. 
 
From private workshops to team building, from children’s parties to community group presentations, read on for more information about how Cultural Keys can help you get more out of your time in China!

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Do you speak ‘Englinese’? The mashup of English and Chinese

A classic, taken from us 太快了

As anyone who has lived in China for more than a few months will tell you, Chinglish is most definitely a common feature of life and culture here. But while Chinglish is most commonly seen as mistakes made when translating English directly into Chinese, what about the other end of the spectrum: when people specifically choose to (or habitually) include Chinese words when speaking English?

Not sure what we mean, or what kinds of words and phrases might be used in ‘Englinese’? Read on to find out!

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